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Over a million people in the South East will lose out by £10,000 each under Government’s plans for state pension age change

New analysis by the House of Commons Library has revealed that 7.6 million people will lose out by nearly £10,000 each under the Government’s plans to bring forward changes to the state pension age. 1,066,000 people will lose out in the South East.

The change will affect all men and women currently between the age of 39 and 47, who will be forced to work a year longer before they can access their state pension entitlement.

The Government’s announcement of their plans to bring forward changes to the state pension age last Thursday came more than two months after their legal deadline, 7 May 2017, evading debate on the issue leading up to the General Election.

The announcement was heavily criticised, as it followed evidence from the renowned expert on life expectancy, Professor Sir Michael Marmot, who just days before had described how a century-long rise in life expectancy was “pretty close to having ground to a halt.” Professor Marmot pointed to 2010 as the turning point, when the Government began its austerity programme.

Just over a week ago, the Government’s own advisory body, Public Health England, had published data showing significant disparities in Healthy Life Expectancy. For example, it showed how on average a man living in Nottingham would be only be expected to live in good health until the age of 57, a full eleven years earlier than the Government’s newly timetabled state pension age increase to 68.

A Director of Public Health England described how the average pensioner will now have to deal with a “toxic cocktail” of ill health throughout their whole retirement, and for some years before.

Debbie Abrahams MP, Labour’s Shadow Work and Pensions Secretary, said:

“This is a disgraceful and unjustified attack on the state pension by this Government, who are asking millions of people to work longer to pay for their failing austerity plans.

“Labour want to take a measured approach, leaving the state pension age at 66 while we review the evidence emerging around life expectancy and healthy life expectancy, considering how we can best protect those doing demanding jobs and the contributions they have already made.”

Ends

Notes to editors:

1.      Quote from House of Commons Library analysis of the impact of changes to the state pension age: “Table A.1, page 32 of the Government’s State Pension Age Final Report shows that the SPA change announced on Wednesday will reduce state pension expenditure by around £74 billion between 2037/38 and 2045/46 (the period over which people will be affected by this change). £74 billion divided by 7.6 million equals an average ‘loss’ of around £9,800 per person. This is what we might expect, as it is approximately equivalent to around one year’s worth of payments of the new State Pension (£159.55 per week * 52 weeks = £8,300 per annum).”

 2.      Comments on trends in Life Expectancy by Professor Sir Michael Marmot:[https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/jul/18/rise-in-life-expectancy-has-stalled-since-2010-research-shows

3.      Public Health England report into Healthy Life Expectancy: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/health-profile-for-england/chapter-1-life-expectancy-and-healthy-life-expectancy 

 

Over a million people in the South East will lose out by £10,000 each under Government’s plans for state pension age change

Over a million people in the South East will lose out by £10,000 each under Government’s plans for state pension age change New analysis by the House of Commons Library...

Andy McDonald, Labour’s Shadow Transport Secretary, commenting on the announcement that Southeastern will increase off-peak fare prices, said:

“This further fare rise is another slap in the face for long-suffering rail passengers. Fares have sky rocketed since 2010, passenger satisfaction is plummeting and punctuality has fallen to a ten year low.

“A railway works best as an integrated network, but privatisation and franchising have meant breaking it up to create opportunities for companies to extract a profit, resulting in costly inefficiencies resulting in sky high fares.

“The current system is broken. It is time for our railways to be run under public ownership, in the public interest as an integrated national asset with affordable fares for all and long-term investment in the railway network.”

Ends 

This further fare rise is another slap in the face for long-suffering rail passengers- McDonald

Andy McDonald, Labour’s Shadow Transport Secretary, commenting on the announcement that Southeastern will increase off-peak fare prices, said: “This further fare rise is another slap in the face for long-suffering...

 

Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi has been selected to be the Labour parliamentary candidate for Slough.

Tan is the Chair of Gravesham Constituency Labour Party, the former Mayor of Gravesham and is a seasoned campaigner for the Labour Party in the South East.

Tan Dhesi said:

“It is a privilege and an honour to be selected as Labour’s candidate for Slough, the town I was born and brought up in, and a place I love so much.  

“I want to thank Fiona Mactaggart for her 20 years of dedication to Slough and the Labour Party.

“I am determined to be a strong voice for Slough after 7 years of damaging Tory cuts. 

“This General Election is a choice between a Labour Party, who will stand up for the many and a Conservative Party, which only looks after the privileged few.

“If elected, I will work tirelessly for the people of Slough.”

Ends

Note to editors

Selection is subject to NEC endorsement – the NEC meets to endorse candidates next week

Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi has been selected to be the Labour parliamentary candidate for Slough

  Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi has been selected to be the Labour parliamentary candidate for Slough. Tan is the Chair of Gravesham Constituency Labour Party, the former Mayor of Gravesham and...

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